VICTORIAN OUTPOST GRIMSBYS NUMBER ONE  GAMING VENUE

  THE  COLONIAL AGE OF EUROPEAN EXPANSION

UPDATE 15TH JAN - ALLIES DRIVE FOR THE RHINE BRIDGE PT 2

The Allies Drive for the Rhine Bridge

Since December the U. S. First and Ninth Arimes had been building up strength behind the swollen little Roer River. On Feb. 23 they let it go with a stunning night barrage. The Germans at the river were quickly overpowered. Beyond the river the rigid framework of their Rhineland defense began to break down. A week after the first gun had been fired at the Roer, the Ninth had arrived at the Rhine opposite Dusseldorf. The men of the Ninth exchanged shots with the Germans on the other side.

Lieut. General William H. Simpson, commander of the Ninth, hd been waiting for this drive to the Rhine. If the river was to be crossed by his army, the smooth crossing of the Roer was a battle rehearsal. For weeks the muddy little stream had been an obsession with the men of the Ninth. They prepared and planned to cross it early in February, in coordination with drives by the Canadians and General Patton's Third Army. But on the eve of the crossing the Germans opened the gates in the big earth dams of the upper Roer, partly flooding the cabbage land of the lower valley. General Simpson was forced to postpone the crossing while his engineers calculated when it would be possible.

The engineers, watching the flood dimish, told the general the crossing could be made on Feb. 23. The Ninth began to get ready again. The men and tanks and portable sections of pontoon bridges moved up to the river. At 2:45 A.M. the barrage began and a smokescreen drifted over river to cover the crossing.

 

As the morning sun shines through the open roof of a house in Julich, Ninth Army infantrymen dash across Roer under German mortar and machine-gun fire.

The U. S. Breakthrough Begins with the Crossing of the Roer: The Ninth Army's crossing of the Roer was a short, violent struggle against the Germans and the river. Forty-five minutes after the night barrage had begun, assault boats and amphibious tractors started across in a great wave. In some of the boats were combat engineers, ferrying cables to moor their pontoon bridges in midstream. It was an excruiating few hours for the engineers. The flood had lessened but the current was still swift and strong. Runaway boats and pontoons careened downsteam crashing into the bridges as they were being built. As the work went on the Germans kept up a blind but deadly machine-gun and mortar barrage through the smokescreen. But in spite of diffculties there were two footbridges across the Roer in the morning. Later the engineers put in bigger bridges for trucks and tanks.

We began our game from this point, the bridge intact and the mortar and machine gun  with some support counter-attack.Game is a 12ft by 6ft table plenty of cover for both sides, Americans had to defend the bridge as best as possible and the Germans to take the bridge, game was 10 turns and whoever had control of the bridge and surrounding villages  won .... 28mm figures and as always more pictures on the website at http://www.victorian-steel.com/





UPDATE 9TH JAN - BOXER REBELLION FLAGS NOW AVAILABLE FROM  http://adrianswalls.co.uk/-WORKBENCH
UPDATE 6TH JAN - THE ALLIES DRIVE FOR THE RHINE BRIDGE
Since December the U. S. First and Ninth Arimes had been building up strength behind the swollen little Roer River. On Feb. 23 they let it go with a stunning night barrage. The Germans at the river were quickly overpowered. Beyond the river the rigid framework of their Rhineland defense began to break down. A week after the first gun had been fired at the Roer, the Ninth had arrived at the Rhine opposite Dusseldorf. The men of the Ninth exchanged shots with the Germans on the other side.

Lieut. General William H. Simpson, commander of the Ninth, hd been waiting for this drive to the Rhine. If the river was to be crossed by his army, the smooth crossing of the Roer was a battle rehearsal. For weeks the muddy little stream had been an obsession with the men of the Ninth. They prepared and planned to cross it early in February, in coordination with drives by the Canadians and General Patton's Third Army. But on the eve of the crossing the Germans opened the gates in the big earth dams of the upper Roer, partly flooding the cabbage land of the lower valley. General Simpson was forced to postpone the crossing while his engineers calculated when it would be possible.

The engineers, watching the flood dimish, told the general the crossing could be made on Feb. 23. The Ninth began to get ready again. The men and tanks and portable sections of pontoon bridges moved up to the river. At 2:45 A.M. the barrage began and a smokescreen drifted over river to cover the crossing.

 

As the morning sun shines through the open roof of a house in Julich, Ninth Army infantrymen dash across Roer under German mortar and machine-gun fire.

The U. S. Breakthrough Begins with the Crossing of the Roer: The Ninth Army's crossing of the Roer was a short, violent struggle against the Germans and the river. Forty-five minutes after the night barrage had begun, assault boats and amphibious tractors started across in a great wave. In some of the boats were combat engineers, ferrying cables to moor their pontoon bridges in midstream. It was an excruiating few hours for the engineers. The flood had lessened but the current was still swift and strong. Runaway boats and pontoons careened downsteam crashing into the bridges as they were being built. As the work went on the Germans kept up a blind but deadly machine-gun and mortar barrage through the smokescreen. But in spite of diffculties there were two footbridges across the Roer in the morning. Later the engineers put in bigger bridges for trucks and tanks.

We began our game from this point, the bridge intact and the mortar and machine gun  with some support counter-attack.Game is a 12ft by 6ft table plenty of cover for both sides, Americans had to defend the bridge as best as possible and the Germans to take the bridge, game was 10 turns and whoever had control of the bridge and surrounding villages  won .... 28mm figures and as always more pictures on the website at http://www.victorian-steel.com/






UPDATE 28TH DEC NAPOLEONIC MASS BATTLE PT 2
UPDATE 9TH DEC - 15MM NAPOLEONIC MASS BATTLE - GALLERY
UPDATE 26TH NOV ROMAN SASSANID WAR PT 2 - GALLERY
UPDATE 18TH NOV - ROMAN SASSANID WAR 421 - 422

 The Roman–Sassanid war of 421–422 was a conflict between the Eastern Roman Empire and the Sassanids. The casus belli was the persecution of Christians by the Sassanid king Bahram V, which had come as a response to attacks by Christians against Zoroastrian temples; the Christian Eastern Roman Emperor Theodosius II declared war and obtained some victories, but in the end the two powers agreed to sign a peace on the status quo ante.

The commander-in-chief of the Roman army was Ardaburius, who, incidentally, came from the Iranian tribe of the Alans. Ardaburius needed to collect many troops for his campaign. Theodosius, therefore, allowed some Pannonian Ostrogoths to settle in Thracia, to defend the province from the Huns while the Thracian Roman troops were sent to the East.

Ardaburius sent Anatolius to Persarmenia, where he joined the rebels, while Ardaburius entered in Persian territory and devastated Arzanene. The general of the Sassanid army, Narses, moved with his troops against Ardaburius, and engaged the Romans in battle, but was defeated and forced to retreat. Narses planned to attack Mesopotamia, a Roman province that had been left unguarded, and moved there, but Ardaburius foresaw his enemy's plan and reached Mesopotamia.

Ardaburius received reinforcements and put the fortress of Nisibis under siege. Bahram allied with the Lakhmid Arabs of Alamundarus (Al-Mundhir I of Hirah), who, however, were dispersed by the Romans. In the meantime, the King of the Huns, Rua, had attacked the dioceses of Dacia and Thracia and had even menaced Constantinople; at the same time, a large Persian army moved towards Nisibis. To avoid a war on two fronts, Theodosius then recalled Ardaburius back.

UPDATE 13TH NOV -RUSSO TURK WAR 1676-1681 PART 2 - GALLERY
UPDATE 04-NOV-RUSSO TURK WAR 1676-1681 - GALLERY
The Russo–Turkish War of 1676–1681, a war between the Tsardom of Russia and Ottoman Empire, caused by Turkish expansionism in the second half of the 17th century. After having captured and devastated the region of Podolia in the course of the Polish–Turkish War of 1672–1676, the Ottoman government strove to spread its rule over all of the Right-bank Ukraine with the support of its vassal (since 1669), Hetman Petro Doroshenko. The latter’s pro-Turkish policy caused discontent among many Ukrainian Cossacks, which would elect Ivan Samoilovich (Hetman of the Left-bank Ukraine) as a sole Hetman of all Ukraine in 1674.

Doroshenko decided to fight back, and in 1676, his army of 12,000 men seized the city of Chyhyryn, counting on the approaching Turkish-Tatar army. However, the Russian and Ukrainian forces under the command of Samoilovich and Grigory Romodanovsky besieged Chyhyryn and made Doroshenko surrender. Leaving a garrison in Chyhyryn, the Russian and Ukrainian armies retreated to the left bank of the Dnieper. The Turkish Sultan appointed Yuri Khmelnitsky Hetman of the Right-bank Ukraine, who had been the Sultan’s prisoner at that time. In July 1677, the Sultan ordered his army (45,000 men) under the command of Ibrahim Pasha to advance towards Chyhyryn.

Ibrahim Pasha's army did not arrive at Chyhyryn until August 4, 1677. Samoilovich and Grigory Romodanovsky's forces rendezvoused on August 10, and by August 24 only had to cross the Sula River to reach Chyhyryn. On August 26–27, a skirmish between Muscovite and Ukrainian and Ottoman troops removed Ottoman observation posts and allowed the rest of the Muscovite and Ukrainian forces to cross the river unmolested. Muscovite and Ukrainian cavalry attacked and overwhelmed Ibrahim Pasha's camp, on the August 28, inflicting heavy casualties. The following day, Ibrahim lifted the siege of Chyhyryn and retreated to the Igul' River. Samoilovich and Grigory Romodanovsky relieved Chyhyryn on September 5. The Ottoman Army had lost 20,000 men and Ibrahim was imprisoned upon his return to Constantinople.

In July 1678, the Turkish army (approx. 80,000 men) of the Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa besieged Chyhyryn once again. The Russian and Ukrainian armies (20,000 men) broke through the Turkish covering force, however, the Turks had already managed to occupy Chyhyryn on August 11. The Russian army retreated over the Dnieper, beating off the pursuing Turkish army, which would finally leave them in peace.

In 1679–1680, the Russians repelled the attacks of the Crimean Tatars and signed the Bakhchisaray Peace Treaty on January 3, 1681, which would establish the Russo-Turkish border by the Dnieper.

UPDATE 29TH OCT - WHEN TWO TRIBES GO TO WAR PT 2 - GALLERY
UPDATE 21ST OCT - WHEN TWO TRIBES GO TO WAR - GALLERY

When two tribes go to war, East africa

Germany was quite late in the empire building that characterized the 19th and early 20th centuries. In Africa, the Germans colonized what is now Cameroon, Tanzania, Uganda, and Namibia. In the Pacific, they colonized portions of what is now Papua New Guinea, Nauru and the Solomon Islands.

These efforts were a source of tension between the German Empire and other European powers, especially Great Britain and France, even though Germany did not have the head start or the military resources to seriously compete along those lines. Nonetheless, these colonies provided the venue for one of the first examples of genocide in the 20th century, in what is now Namibia. Between 1904-05, the German army killed tens of thousands of rebelling Herero and Namaqua, primarily by destroying food and water sources and driving refugees into the Namib Desert. All of Germany's overseas colonies were dismantled following the end of WWI and the Versailles Treaty.


UPDATE 8TH OCT - DODGE CITY PT 2
UPDATE 30TH SEPT - DODGE CITY - GALLERY

For over 20 years after the Civil War, cowboys coaxed herds of cattle along arduous trails from the Texas grasslands north to the railheads in Kansas. At the end of the trail lay the infamous cow towns, the "Sodoms of the plains", places such as Abilene, Hays City, Wichita, Ellsworth and Dodge City. After following a slow moving herd of cattle along a dusty trail for as many as three months, these towns offered the cowboy a place to take a bath, gamble, find a woman, eat some good food and let off some steam. The towns accommodated their visitors with a liberal attitude towards their boisterous behavior. There were limits, however, and the towns hired enforcers to maintain a semblance of law and order. Law officers such as Wyatt Earp, Wild Bill Hickok, Luke Short and Bat Masterson became legends.

The prosperity of these towns continued only as long as the railroad provided a railhead. As the railroad moved farther west the towns fizzled while another took its place. Some, like Newton, Kansas, lasted only one season. Dodge City lasted much longer, but when the railroads pushed their tracks into Texas and closer to the grazing land, Dodge's days as a cattle town ended.


UPDATE 16TH SEPT - TROUBLE ON THE RIVER LIU 1900 PT 2 - GALLERY

UPDATE 09TH SEPTEMBER - TROUBLE ON THE RIVER LIU 1900 - GALLERY


Boxer Rebellion, officially supported peasant uprising of 1900 that attempted to drive all foreigners from China. “Boxers” was a name that foreigners gave to a Chinese secret society known as the Yihequan (“Righteous and Harmonious Fists”). The group practiced certain boxing and calisthenic rituals in the belief that this made them invulnerable. It was thought to be an offshoot of the Eight Trigrams Society (Baguajiao), which had fomented rebellions against the Qing dynasty in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Their original aim was the destruction of the dynasty and also of the Westerners who had a privileged position in China.



An international force of some 19,000 troops was assembled, most of the soldiers coming from Japan and Russia but many also from Britain, the United States, France, Austria-Hungary, and Italy. On August 14, 1900, that force finally captured Beijing, relieving the foreigners and Christians besieged there since June 20. While foreign troops looted the capital, the empress dowager and her court fled westward to Xi’an in Shaanxi province, leaving behind a few imperial princes to conduct the negotiations. After extensive discussions, a protocol was finally signed in September 1901, ending the hostilities and providing for reparations to be made to the foreign powers.



UPDATE 2ND SEPTEMBER - LATE ROMAN V BARBARIANS PT 2 - GALLERY
UPDATE 25TH AUGUST - LATE ROMANS V BARBARIANS - GALLERY
UPDATE 12TH AUGUST - SASSANID ARMY - WORKBENCH
UPDATE 10TH AUGUST - MASAI TRIBE - WORKBENCH
UPDATE 5TH AUGUST - SCHLESWIG HOLSTEIN WAR PT 2 - GALLERY

The First Schleswig War (German: Schleswig-Holsteinischer Krieg) or Three Years' War (Danish: Treårskrigen) was the first round of military conflict in southern Denmark and northern Germany rooted in the Schleswig-Holstein Question, contesting the issue of who should control the Duchies of Schleswig and Holstein. The war, which lasted from 1848 to 1851, also involved troops from Prussia and Sweden. Ultimately, the war resulted in a Danish victory. A second conflict, the Second Schleswig War, erupted in 1864.

1848

Wishing to defeat Denmark before Prussian, Austrian, and German troops arrived to support them, 7,000 Schleswig-Holsteinish soldiers under General Krohn occupied Flensborg on March 31. Over 7,000 Danish soldiers landed east of the city, and Krohn, fearing he would be surrounded, ordered his forces to withdraw. The Danes were able to reach the Schleswig-Holsteiners before they were able to retreat, and the subsequent Battle of Bov on April 9 was a Danish victory. At the battle, the Prince of Noer, senior commander of the Schleswig-Holsteinish forces, did not arrive until two hours after fighting had started, and the Schleswig-Holsteiners were more prepared for the withdrawal they had intended to make before they were attacked than for an engagement.

Although the tabletop game was not Bov we decided to game the 1848 period and see how would the Holstein army supported by Prussians would stand agaist the Danish army.

Plenty of figures on the table as always and rules were Victorian Steel with minor adjustments.



UPDATE 30th JULY AFRICAN SCENARIOS 1838-1884 VOL ONE  - PDF DOWNLOADS


All play tested at the Victorian Outpost Grimsby.
Victorian Steel are pleased to make available a free PDF featuring three scenarios for the African wars 1838-1884, complete with maps, army lists and some great colour photos of the battles taken at the Victorian Outpost Grimsby


UPDATE 29th JULY - INDIAN MUTINY WARGAME SCENARIOS VOL ONE - PDF DOWNLOADS

All play tested at the Victorian Outpost Grimsby.
Victorian Steel are pleased to make available a free PDF featuring three scenarios for the Indian Mutiny, complete with maps, army lists and some great colour photos of the battles taken at the Victorian Outpost Grimsby.



UPDATE 27TH JULY - WEB STORE - BOSHIN FLAG SHEETS

CONVERSIONS - WORKBENCH
UPDATE 26TH JULY - WEB STORE - 28MM AUSTRIAN FLAGS
UPDATE 20TH JULY - GALLERY SCHLESWIG HOLSTEIN WAR 1848
The First Schleswig War (German: Schleswig-Holsteinischer Krieg) or Three Years' War (Danish: Treårskrigen) was the first round of military conflict in southern Denmark and northern Germany rooted in the Schleswig-Holstein Question, contesting the issue of who should control the Duchies of Schleswig and Holstein. The war, which lasted from 1848 to 1851, also involved troops from Prussia and Sweden. Ultimately, the war resulted in a Danish victory. A second conflict, the Second Schleswig War, erupted in 1864.

1848

Wishing to defeat Denmark before Prussian, Austrian, and German troops arrived to support them, 7,000 Schleswig-Holsteinish soldiers under General Krohn occupied Flensborg on March 31. Over 7,000 Danish soldiers landed east of the city, and Krohn, fearing he would be surrounded, ordered his forces to withdraw. The Danes were able to reach the Schleswig-Holsteiners before they were able to retreat, and the subsequent Battle of Bov on April 9 was a Danish victory. At the battle, the Prince of Noer, senior commander of the Schleswig-Holsteinish forces, did not arrive until two hours after fighting had started, and the Schleswig-Holsteiners were more prepared for the withdrawal they had intended to make before they were attacked than for an engagement.

Although the tabletop game was not Bov we decided to game the 1848 period and see how would the Holstein army supported by Prussians would stand agaist the Danish army.

Plenty of figures on the table as always and rules were Victorian Steel with minor adjustments.

UPDATE 6TH JULY - WORKBENCH

New Government building 28mm in size available from http://adrianswalls.co.uk/ have put a number of pictures of this beautiful building in the workbench, it truly is a work of art and would fit in a number of historical periods around the globe

UPDATE 29TH JUNE JAPANESE BUILDINGS - WORKBENCH
28mm Japanese buildings created

Been very busy painting up the Crusades over the last few weeks, sometimes things get abit boring, so last week as i was painting up miniatures i thought i was in need of Japanese buildings for my Boshin war of 1868, very quickly put together i created four buildings and still manage to paint up around 70 Crusades.

All not perfect and as always a number of small mistakes but on a tabletop 28mm game it represents what i want it to be and adds to the period.

I have also began on my Boshin war battalions and i got my soldering iron kit to create the crossbar on the flag bearer, i have also been busy creating alot of those Boshin period flags, which will soon be available on the website.

UPDATE 27TH JUNE - ISLAMIC SARACENS PAINTED - WORKBENCH
More 28mm miniatures of the Crusade period are put into the collection, alot of the miniatures are from Black Tree Design, which i think are probably the best place to get bargains and great discounts.
UPDATE 22ND JUNE - CRUSADES PAINTED - WORKBENCH.

Been pretty busy creating and painting over the last couple of weeks, here is another batch of Crusades completed, which can be viewed in the "Workbench" tag.

Have yet to put up more photos of the Saracens, Boshin war of 1868 and more of the WOR,
plus a number of  Japanese buildings i have created
UPDATE 15TH JUNE - RUSSIAN CIVIL WAR PT 2 - GALLERY
UPDATE 6TH JUNE - RUSSIAN CIVIL WAR - GALLERY

The Russian Civil War of 1918–20

The civil war between the Bolsheviks (Reds) and the anti-Bolsheviks (Whites) ravaged Russia until 1920. The Whites represented all shades of anti-Communist groups, including members of the constituent assembly. Several of their leaders favored setting up a military dictatorship, but few were outspoken czarists.

Armed opposition to the Soviet regime centered at first in the south, where the volunteers under Kornilov (succeeded by Denikin) joined forces with the Don Cossacks. The Ukraine was the scene of fighting after the Germans evacuated it following the general armistice of Nov. 11, 1918; it was seized by the Bolsheviks (early 1919), by Denikin's forces (Aug.–Dec., 1919), again by the Bolsheviks (Dec., 1919), and finally by the Poles (May, 1920), with whom war had broken out over the Russo-Polish frontier question. Denikin in the meantime had turned over his command to General P. N. Wrangel, who after the conclusion of the Russo-Polish armistice was driven by the Bolsheviks into the Crimea and was obliged to evacuate his forces to Constantinople (Nov., 1920).

The civil war in the east was equally fatal to the Whites. A government was organized at Samara by a group of Socialist Revolutionaries who had been members of the constituent assembly. It received the support of the Czech Legion, which controlled the Trans-Siberian RR, but it merged (Sept., 1918) with a more conservative government set up at Omsk, in Siberia, and a few weeks later fell under the dictatorship of Admiral Kolchak. Although at first successful, Kolchak's forces were eventually driven to the Russian Far East; by Jan., 1920, all Siberia except Vladivostok and some other Far Eastern territory was in Bolshevik hands.

The civil war was complicated by Allied intervention. In N Russia, British, French, and American forces occupied (Mar., 1918) Murmansk and later Arkhangelsk with the stated purpose of protecting Allied stores against possible seizure by the Germans; they were evacuated only in Nov., 1919. In the Russian Far East the Allies occupied Vladivostok, which the Japanese held until 1922.

The Bolshevik military victory was due partly to the lack of cooperation among the various White commanders and partly to the remarkable reorganization of the Red forces after Trotsky became commissar for war. It was won, however, only at the price of immense sacrifice; Russia by 1920 was ruined and devastated. Atrocities were committed throughout the civil war by both sides.

Victorian Steel rules came about as a result of us not being able to find a set of rules that captured the spirit of Victorian Colonial Warfare. The aspects we wanted to capture included the European ability to deliver a volley and follow it up with cold steel whilst  also giving the natives a chance to use their natural advantages of climate and familiarity with the terrain often accompanied by rapid movement which the European forces could rarely match.
We both wargame at Grimsby Wargames Society where large battles are the norm, but these rules give a perfectly good game with only an eight stand European force taking on three to four times its number of native opponents ,so for the cost of a few boxes of Perry Ansar ,Warlord games Zulus or Wargames Factory British and Zulus the Colonial World will come alive! For those of you with a bigger budget there are some superb figures out there in metal and troops of all types will be shown in the rules and the soon to be released Scenario books.
We wanted to add to the value of both the rule set and the scenario books so along with the rules we will include a full colour flag sheet for the rule set covering the British and for the scenario books covering the flags of all the protagonists (assuming they had some!)
We both have years of experience in the hobby starting in my case back in 1969 when I started senior school and we prefer uncomplicated rules with whole figure casualties, no record keeping and easy to remember mechanisms which do not rely on you having to rebase your figures. We also wanted a clear result in a few hours as most games take place in an evening with definite time constraints.In this game the Europeans are always under pressure to complete the task before running low on ammunition or becoming exhausted both of which effects are dealt with simply in the rules.
We have tested the rules using troops from the Indian Mutiny, The Sudan, The Boer War, French Foreign Legion in North Africa, The Boxer Rebellion and Both Russo Japanese  and Sino Japanese forces not to mention Zulus. They seem to work for all of them and the troop classification system allows you to reflect the difference between a Zulu Impi  and a Sudanese Arab Rub as well as the vastly different qualities of Tommy Atkins and an Egyptian soldier impressed in the ill-fated force led by Hicks Pasha.
There is no reason why they cannot be used for the Crimean War and that will be the subject of a future scenario book ( Once we have painted the figures required!)
We are very happy with our first venture into commercial rule writing and we hope you are too!

Dave Tuck and Malc Johnston